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A Beginner’s Guide to Feng Shui with Thierry Chow

With her sharp statement haircut, signature dark lipstick and eclectic sense of style, Thierry Chow might not be what you had in mind when picturing a typical feng shui expert. Daughter of one of the field’s most respected practitioners, Hong Kong feng shui Master Chow Hon Ming, Thierry brings a contemporary touch to the ancient art. Along with her company TRE, which applies a modernised feng shui concept to all aspects of design, the talented Hongkonger recently penned (and illustrated) a feng shui-influenced book, Love and Fate, guiding readers on enhancing love and relationships.


The Style Sheet met up with Chow in her eclectic Chai Wan studio to gain for a three-part beginner’s guide to three areas of her practice she’s passionate about. First up? Chow takes us through pointers for optimising our environment – what she calls ‘one of the most important elements of our lives’ – in order for relationships to have the best chances of flourishing.

Along with air-filtering plants, opt for flowers in pink, red, yellow or orange at home, suggests Chow

Environmental Relationship Enhancers


1. Positive vibes only

‘Opt for homeware objects and decor that spread positive love messages, such as heart-shaped cushions, posters about love and colours that radiate warmth such as pink and yellow,’ shares Chow. ‘Objects that come in a duo are also great for relationships, so try to keep home decor and furniture, such as chairs or cushions, in pairs.’


2. Plants and flowers aplenty

‘Both flowers and plants are ideal for enhancing relationships. Plants create cleaner air, which improves our health and helps one become more positive,’ explains Chow. Some of the most effective air-filtering plants include the spider plant, Chinese evergreen, peace lily and variegated snake plant. When picking blooms, Chow suggests opting for hues of ‘pink, red, yellow and orange’ and staying away from white flowers, symbols of death in Chinese culture.


3. Warm, natural lighting

Light is one of the strongest manifestations of energy, and a fundamental element for creating good feng shui. ‘Natural sunlight enhances our health, and ushers positivity into our lives. If plenty of natural light isn’t a possibility in your space, opt for bulbs that mimic sunlight by radiating a warm yellow glow. Avoid cool, white-toned light bulbs,’ shares Chow.

Chow brings a contemporary touch to the ancient art

Environmental Relationship Dimmers


1. Multiple mirrors

Mirrors show objects in a place that isn’t their physical location, which can be disorienting – and the more mirrors, the more this effect can be amplified. ‘Too many mirrors can cause the mind to be distracted, leading to an unclear thought process, overthinking and an increase in our insecurities over relationships,’ says Chow.


2. Shades of black and white

‘In some cultures, heavy usage of the shades black and white are synonymous with death, which has a negativity impact on the mind.’ In the home, Chow suggests opting for soothing lighter colours such as light blue, light pink, beige, yellow and egg white.


3. Objects that signify singledom

In the same way, Chow suggests looking for home decor pieces that promote messages of love and avoiding those with pessimistic connotations. ‘Objects or posters with symbols or words that represent separation or a broken heart have a negative impact on relationships,’ she warns.


Stay tuned for Thierry’s thoughts on colours in Part 2 and fragrances in Part 3…

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